The Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art was pleased to receive Cultural Immigrant Initiative Awards from our three local city Councilmembers; Councilmember Matteo, Councilmember Rose, and Councilmember Borelli. This year’s programming occurred in April (Immigrant Heritage Month) and May (Asian-Pacific Heritage Month) and in addition to exploring Tibetan traditions, the program also focused on Sri Lankan and Japanese art forms.

The Museum was pleased to welcome Khenpo Pema Wangdak and Yingrik Drubpa Rinpoche, who both presented teachings and Khenpo Pema also led the group in a Tibetan Prayer Flag Raising Ceremony.

 Khenpo Pema Wangdak

In April and May, the Museum welcomed the performers of the Sri Lankan Dance Academy of New York. The dancers and drummer dazzled the audience with their beautiful costumes and drumming skills.

In May visitors to the Museum participated in a 4-day Raku workshop. Raku generally refers to a type of low-firing process that was inspired by traditional Japanese raku firing. Western-style raku usually involves removing pottery from the kiln while at bright red heat and placing it into containers with combustible materials. Once the materials ignite, the containers are closed. This produces an intense reduction atmosphere which affects the color in glazes and clay bodies.   The drastic thermal shock also produces cracking (known as crackling since it is deliberate). The original Japanese style of raku is an outgrowth from Buddhist influences in life and especially in the tea ceremony.