Exhibitions

Four Armed Avalokiteshvara

Four Armed Avalokiteshvara, 85.04.0125 from the Museum’s collection, included in the exhibition Infinite Compassion at Vassar College.

Throughout the year, the Museum presents a calendar of ongoing programs and exhibits. The Museum also lends artifacts from the collection to other museums, galleries, universities and institutions.

Currently On View

Ritual Objects of the Himalayas, April 1, 2017 – December 31, 2017.

This exhibition features a selection of ritual objects, stupas, prayer wheels, mandalas and photographs from the Museum’s collection.

Mongolian Treasures, March 1, 2017 – December 31, 2017.

This exhibition features sculpture from the Museum’s collection of Buddhist deities from Mongolia. Two prominent sculptures include Tsong Khapa, (1357-1419) the founder of the Gelug School of Tibetan Buddhism and a Maitreya Bodhisattva from the early 18th century. The exhibit also includes a selection of Mongolian watercolors.

Tsong Khapa
Detail of Tsong Khapa (Mongolia, 18th Century, Gilded metal alloy, pigments, 85.04.0301) Photo credit: Sean P. Sweeney.

Infinite Compassion: Avalokiteshvara in Asian Art
On View October 2016 – September 2018 at the Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor
Infinite Compassion is an art exhibition of images that embody the concept of compassion but the scope is much larger — it aims to encourage us to meditate on our capacity as human beings to care about each other selflessly in thought and deed. Devoted to the Buddhist deity of compassion, the Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara, Infinite Compassion, is a collaborative exhibition featuring objects from the JMMTA, the Staten Island Museum, the Rubin Museum of Art, the Godwin-Ternbach Museum at Queens College, and private collectors. The exhibition was guest curated by Patricia Eichenbaum Karetsky, PhD.

For additional information about this exhibit and visiting hours of the Staten Island Museum, please visit the Staten Island Museum’s website.

Traveling Exhibitions
Vassar College
Several works from the collection of the Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art were featured at Vassar’s Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center. The exhibition Embodying Compassion in Buddhist Art: Image, Pilgrimage, Practice (April 23 – June 28, 2015) was the first exhibition in America to focus on the bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara in his many forms across Asia. Avalokiteshvara, the bodhisattva of compassion, is among the most popular figures in modern Himalayan and East Asian Buddhism. The Jacques Marchais Museum has a number of exquisite statues and paintings related to Avalokiteshvara.

Information about this exhibition can be found at the Embodying Compassion website. The exhibition’s catalogue can be downloaded as a PDF from the website under the Resources tab. The Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art was honored to participate in this exhibition.

Previous Exhibits

Turning the Wheel: Historic Teachers and Tulku of Tibet
Exhibit Dates: April 1, 2016 – December 31, 2016
Fearsome Gazes: Wrathful Deities from the Collection of Jacques Marchais
Exhibit Dates: April 1, 2015-March 1, 2016
Special Exhibit: Tsering Phuntsok: The Art of Thangka
Exhibit Dates: November 20 – December 19, 2015
Freed From the Vault: Objects from the Collection of Jacques Marchais
Exhibit Dates: January 2013 – June 2014.
Lhasa on the Hudson
Photographs by Mary M. Whitlock
Exhibit Dates: January 29 – October 31, 2012.
Tashi Dhargyal and the Menris Tradition of Thangka Art
Exhibit Dates:June 25, 2011 – November 30, 2011
Tibetan Portrait: The Power of Compassion
Exhibit Dates: March 29, 2009 – April 1, 2011
From Staten Island to Shangri-La: The Collecting Life of Jacques Marchais
Exhibit Dates, March 18, 2007 -December 31, 2008